Saturday, March 17, 2018

Turkey’s Religious Affairs chief: “Not correct to put the words of Islam and reform next to each other”

https://www.jihadwatch.org/2018/03/turkeys-religious-affairs-chief-not-correct-to-put-the-words-of-islam-and-reform-next-to-each-other

Turkey’s Religious Affairs chief: “Not correct to put the words of Islam and reform next to each other”

There are those in the West who are so confident in the prospects for reform in Islam that they take that confidence as an index of the reliability of various analysts: if one is not as sanguine as they are about the prospects for Islamic reform, they’re branded as “racist,” “bigoted” and “Islamophobic.”
Those who bask in this confidence should ponder Ali Erbaş, who is not a terrorist or a member of any “extremist” group. On the contrary, he is the head of the Directorate of Religious Affairs in “moderate” Turkey. And even he says that the words “Islam” and “reform” should not be put together. Erbaş knows that Allah says in the Qur’an (5:3) that he has “perfected” Islam, so how could it need reforming?
And that means that all its calls for violence against unbelievers, and all its misogyny and anti-Semitism, are not going to change.
Erbaş said it. Not some greasy Islamophobe.
“Islam, reform should not appear in same sentence: Diyanet head,” Hürriyet Daily News, March 13, 2018:
Turkey’s Directorate of Religious Affairs (Diyanet) head Ali Erbaş has said the words Islam and reform should not appear in the same sentence, but that the interpretation of Islamic jurisprudence, referred to as “fiqh,” could be updated.
“It is not correct to put the words of Islam and reform next to each other in any way. But Fıqh is always subject to update and needs to be updated,” he said on March 12 during a program broadcasted by CNN Türk.
“There are constants in Islam and there are also variables. With time, judgements may also change. We indicate that judgements may sometimes change because there is a need for that,” Erbaş said, emphasizing that time required updates in “fiqh,” but not in “Islam.”
Indicating that the most important two sources of Islam were the Quran and the teachings of the Prophet Muhammed, referred to as “Sunnah,” he said these two sources would preserve their “universality,” “inalterability” and “stability.”…
“We, as the Directorate of Religious Affairs, reject every kind of interpretation and thought that condones violence against women. A woman is a mother and she is the most important creature, someone who stands by a human in every point [in their lives] and helps them. There is not one single source in either our Prophet’s teachings or in Islam that condones violence against women,” he said.