Saturday, January 06, 2018

Robert Spencer, Jihad Watch: "Archbishop: Up to 10,000 Catholics leaving Bosnia-Herzegovina each year because of discrimination"

https://www.jihadwatch.org/about-robert

ROBERT SPENCER is the director of Jihad Watch, a program of the David Horowitz Freedom Center, and the author of seventeen books, including the New York Times bestsellers The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam (and the Crusades) and The Truth About Muhammad. His latest book is The Complete Infidel’s Guide to Free Speech (and Its Enemies). Coming in November 2017 is Confessions of an Islamophobe (Bombardier Books).
Spencer has led seminars on Islam and jihad for the FBI, the United States Central Command, United States Army Command and General Staff College, the U.S. Army’s Asymmetric Warfare Group, the Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF), the Justice Department’s Anti-Terrorism Advisory Council and the U.S. intelligence community. He has discussed jihad, Islam, and terrorism at a workshop sponsored by the U.S. State Department and the German Foreign Ministry. He is a consultant with the Center for Security Policy.
...
https://www.jihadwatch.org/2018/01/archbishop-up-to-10000-catholics-leaving-bosnia-herzegovina-each-year-because-of-discrimination


Archbishop: Up to 10,000 Catholics leaving Bosnia-Herzegovina each year because of discrimination


Who is doing the discriminating? Bosnia-Herzegovina is 51% Muslim, and 15% Catholic. And Islamic law contains no societal model whereby Muslims and non-Muslims live together with equal rights. But Archbishop Puljić dares not spell out what is happening, lest he run afoul of his relentlessly Islamopandering boss in Rome.
“Up to 10,000 Catholics are leaving Bosnia-Herzegovina every year because of discrimination, Archbishop reveals,” European Post, January 5, 2018:
Up to 10,000 Catholics are leaving Bosnia-Herzegovina every year because of state discrimination against the religious minority, according to the country’s cardinal Vinko Puljić, Archbishop of Vrhbosna, denounced during an interview with the Pontificial foundation Aid to the Church in Need.
He told ACN that the ongoing haemorrhaging was a legacy of the 1992-95 war that caused at least 250,000 of the faithful – around half the country’s Catholics – to become refugees.
“The Dayton Accords were not implemented in practice, and those who suffered most were the Catholic Croat minority. It is harder for them to defend their basic rights. (…) There are no equal rights for them in those areas where the Catholic minority finds itself in the midst of a majority of the other ethnic groups. This discrimination is expressed in political and administrative terms and above all where employment is concerned.”