Saturday, December 23, 2017

Indonesia: Muslims threaten to hunt down other Muslims for wearing Santa hats - Robert Spencer, Jihad Watch


ROBERT SPENCER is the director of Jihad Watch, a program of the David Horowitz Freedom Center, and the author of seventeen books, including the New York Times bestsellers The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam (and the Crusades) and The Truth About Muhammad. His latest book is The Complete Infidel’s Guide to Free Speech (and Its Enemies). Coming in November 2017 is Confessions of an Islamophobe (Bombardier Books).
Spencer has led seminars on Islam and jihad for the FBI, the United States Central Command, United States Army Command and General Staff College, the U.S. Army’s Asymmetric Warfare Group, the Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF), the Justice Department’s Anti-Terrorism Advisory Council and the U.S. intelligence community. He has discussed jihad, Islam, and terrorism at a workshop sponsored by the U.S. State Department and the German Foreign Ministry. He is a consultant with the Center for Security Policy.
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https://www.jihadwatch.org/2017/12/indonesia-muslims-threaten-to-hunt-down-other-muslims-for-wearing-santa-hats

Indonesia: Muslims threaten to hunt down other Muslims for wearing Santa hats


Indonesia is “moderate.” If it weren’t, they would have killed the Santa hat-wearers with no warning.
“Islamists threaten to hunt down Muslims in Santa hats after issuing a fatwa against firms that force their staff to wear Christmas clothes,” by Julian Robinson, MailOnline, December 22, 2017 (thanks to the Geller Report):
Islamists have threatened to hunt down Muslims in Santa hats after issuing a fatwa against firms that force their staff to wear Christmas clothes in Indonesia.
The Islamic Defenders Front (FPI) warned of ‘sweeping operations’ in the world’s biggest Muslim-majority country, and said ordering Muslims to wear Christmas attire was a violation of their human rights.
Indonesia is home to several religious minorities, including Christians, Hindus, Buddhists and people who follow traditional beliefs.
The constitution guarantees freedom of religion in an officially secular state though tension between followers of different faiths can flare.
‘There can be no sweeping operations … members of the public should respect other religions that are carrying out celebrations,’ national police chief Tito Karnavian told police during a security exercise in the capital, Jakarta.
The FPI said it aimed to enforce a fatwa, or decree, issued by Indonesia’s Islamic Clerical Council in 2016 prohibiting business owners from forcing employees to wear Christmas clothing.
‘We will raid businesses in anticipation of them being stubborn about this and we will be accompanied by police,’ said Novel Bakmukmin, head of the FPI’s Jakarta chapter….