Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Raymond Ibrahim, Frontpage Magazine: A Hate To Die For

A bit about foremost expert Raymond Ibrahim:

http://raymondibrahim.com/about/


About


RAYMOND IBRAHIM is a widely published author, public speaker, and Middle East and Islam specialist.  His books include Crucified Again: Exposing Islam’s New War on Christians (2013) and The Al Qaeda Reader (2007). His writings, translations, and observations have appeared in a variety of publications, including the New York Times, CNN, LA Times, Fox News, Financial Times, Jerusalem Post, New York Times Syndicate, United Press International, USA Today, Washington Post, Washington Times, and Weekly Standard; scholarly journals, including the Almanac of Islamism, Chronicle of Higher Education, Hoover Institution’s Strategika, Jane’s Islamic Affairs Analyst, Middle East Quarterly, and Middle East Review of International Affairs; and popular websites, such as American Thinker, the Blaze, Bloomberg, Breitbart, Christian Post, Daily Caller, FrontPage Magazine, Gatestone Institute, the Inquisitr, Jihad Watch, NewsMax, National Review Online, PJ Media, the UK’s Commentator, and World Magazine. He has contributed chapters to several anthologies and been translated into dozens of languages.
Ibrahim guest lectures at universities, including the National Defense Intelligence College, briefs governmental agencies, such as U.S. Strategic Command and the Defense Intelligence Agency, provides expert testimony for Islam-related lawsuits, and has testified before Congress regarding the conceptual failures that dominate American discourse concerning Islam and the worsening plight of Egypt’s Christian Copts. Among other media, he has appeared on MSNBC, Fox News, C-SPAN, PBS, Reuters, Al-Jazeera, Blaze TV, CBN, and NPR; he has done hundreds of radio interviews and instructed two courses for Prager University.
Ibrahim’s dual-background—born and raised in the U.S. by Coptic Egyptian parents born and raised in the Middle East—has provided him with unique advantages, from equal fluency in English and Arabic, to an equal understanding of the Western and Middle Eastern mindsets, positioning him to explain the latter to the former. His interest in Islamic civilization was first piqued when he began visiting the Middle East as a child in the 1970s. Interacting and conversing with the locals throughout the decades has provided him with an intimate appreciation for that part of the world, complementing his academic training.
Raymond received his B.A. and M.A. (both in History, focusing on the ancient and medieval Near East, with dual-minors in Philosophy and Literature) from California State University, Fresno. There he studied closely with noted military-historian Victor Davis Hanson. He also took graduate courses at Georgetown University’s Center for Contemporary Arab Studies—including classes on the history, politics, and economics of the Arab world—and studied Medieval Islam and Semitic languages at Catholic University of America. His M.A. thesis examined an early military encounter between Islam and Byzantium based on arcane Arabic and Greek texts.
Ibrahim’s resume includes: serving as an Arabic language and regional specialist at the Near East Section of the Library of Congress, where he was often contacted by, and provided information to, defense and intelligence personnel involved in the fields of counterterrorism and area studies, as well as the Congressional Research Service; serving as associate director of the Middle East Forum, a Philadelphia think tank; and serving as a CBN News analyst and contributor.
He resigned from all positions in order to focus exclusively on researching and writing, and is currently a Shillman Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center, a Judith Friedman Rosen Writing Fellow, Middle East Forum, and a Hoover Institution Media Fellow (2013), among other titles and affiliations.
A bit abour FrontPage Magazine, a project of the David Horowitz Freedom Center
FrontPage Magazine, the Center’s online journal of news and political commentary has 1.5 million visitors and over 870,000 unique visitors a month (65 million hits) and is linked to over 2000 other websites.  The magazine’s coverage of and commentary about events has been greatly augmented over the last two years by the presence of four  Shillman Fellows in Journalism underwritten by board member Dr. Robert Shillman. FrontPage has recently added a blog called “The Point,” run by Shillman Fellow Daniel Greenfield, which has tripled web traffic.

http://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/265374/hate-die-raymond-ibrahim

A HATE TO DIE FOR



What Islam teaches is one of the highest offerings to Allah.

 

Raymond Ibrahim is a Shillman Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center.
“The time is coming when anyone who kills you will think they are offering a service to God”
– Jesus
Muslim attacks on Christian churches are on the rise all around the worldincluding in America.  The worst occurred last month when a bomb exploded in the St. Peter Cathedral in Egypt, killing 28, mostly women and children.  Preliminary investigations had indicated that a woman entered the church, sat in the women’s section, and then left an unattended purse that later detonated.  Later reports asserted that, although others were involved, including one Muslim woman, a male suicide-bomber was the chief culprit (graphic pictures of his remains here).
How much hate must a woman have to enter a church, smile in the faces of Christians, pretend to be worshipping alongside them—here’s a similar example from Turkey—and then knowingly leave a bomb precisely where it would kill mostly women and children?  How much hate must a man have for people who are peacefully praying that, in order to kill as many of them, he is willing to kill himself?
The answer is an unfathomable—and, to Western and Christian minds, unbelievable—amount of hate.    Yet the wonder isn’t that the church was bombed but rather that many are surprised by it.  After all, many Muslim scriptures, clerics, mosques, schools, satellite stations and Internet sites—even the ministry of education—openly incite hatred for Egypt’s indigenous (but “infidel”) inhabitants: the Christian Copts.   They teach that Muslims must hate—and show that they hate—Christians, even if they are their own wives.   
Worse, they teach that the most abominable crimes in God’s sight—“worse than murder and bloodshed”—take place inside churches: there, Christians flaunt their rejection of Islam’s core doctrine of tawhid (“monotheism”) by ascribing partners to God (shirk) via their worship of the Trinity. This is why some of Islam’s most revered ulema (scholars) describe churches as “worse than bars and brothels” and “dens of iniquity” which “breed corruption throughout the lands” (see Crucified Again, pgs. 32-36).
Modern Egyptian clerics constantly echo these slanders.  In August 2009, Al Azhar’s Dar al-Ifta issued a fatwa likening the building of a church to “a nightclub, a gambling casino, or building a barn for rearing pigs, cats or dogs.”  In July 2012, Dr. Yassir al-Burhami, Egypt’s leading Salafi, issued a fatwa forbidding Muslim taxi-drivers and bus-drivers from transporting Christian clergy to their churches, which he depicted as “more forbidden than taking someone to a liquor bar.”  When ISIS launched a suicide attack on a packed church in Baghdad in 2011—killing about 60 Christians (graphic images of aftermath here)—they justified it by referring to the church as a “dirty den of idolatry.”
But it’s not just ISIS and “radical” clerics that harbor such animosity for churches.  After the fatal bombing inside St. Peter’s, “everyday” Muslims wrote things like “God bless the person who did this blessed act” on social media.  One average looking Muslim woman appears in the streets of Egypt jubilantly celebrating the massacre (video with English subtitles).   She triumphantly yells “Allahu Akbar!” and says that “our beloved prophet Muhammad is paying you infidels [Christians] back… for rejecting tawhid, which must be proclaimed in every corner of Egypt!”
Americans may remember that Muslims around the world also celebrated the terror strikes of 9/11.  Then, the assumption was “we must’ve done something to make Muslims hate us so much.”  But if powerful America is capable of provoking Muslims, what did Egypt’s already downtrodden and ostracized Christian minority do to make Muslims celebrate the news that a church was bombed and Christians blown to pieces?
In other words, the hate is everywhere and on open display for those with eyes and ears to see and hear with.  It’s on open display when Muslim “refugees” in Europe go on church vandalizing sprees, a regular feature of the West these days (here’s a video of one).  Indeed, the ongoing desecration of churches, crucifixes, and Christian icons at the hands of Muslims continues to be so virulent as to be described—from the earliest recorded descriptions of Islam (see Athanasius of Sinai’s 7th century writings) till today—as the “work of Satan’s offspring.”  
In Egypt the hate is usually simmering below the line of what is deemed newsworthy and only reaches the West when Muslim piety boils over and leaves a trail of carnage in its wake.  “Amateur” attacks on churches that fail to claim lives, or Muslims abusing, kidnapping, beating, raping—and sometimes even murdering[1]—Christians, are habitual occurrences in Egypt and other Muslim majority nations that rarely get reported in the West.  Yet the fact remains: the animus that regularly causes large Muslim mobs to form and torch buildings on the mere rumor that they are being used as churches, is the same animus that causes more zealous Muslims to bomb churches.
These latter—the professional jihadis and “martyrs”—believe themselves to be the greatest allies of God.  They cite the Islamic doctrine of al-wala’ wa’l-bara’ (“Loyalty an Enmity”), which is based on a number of Koran verses. It teaches that the best way for a Muslim to proclaim his loyalty to Islam (submission to Allah and adherence to Muhammad’s teachings) is by showing and exercising hate for those who reject it. 
The most supreme way of living this hate is by becoming a jihadi—killing and being killed, as Koran 9:111 puts it:  “Allah has bought from the believers their lives and worldly goods, and in return has promised them Paradise: they shall fight in the way of Allah and shall kill and be killed….  Rejoice then in the bargain you have struck, for that is the supreme triumph.”  
***
Whenever Muslims kill Christians for their faith, eulogies for the latter—including for the 28 slain at St. Peter’s—often cite the words of Christ: “The time is coming when anyone who kills you will think they are offering a service to God” (John 16:2).  Not only is this verse prophetic but it is key to understanding the virulent hate some Muslims have for Christians.  In short, they truly believe that they are offering a service to God by killing Christians.  And they believe this, not because they are “radical” or have “perverted” the teachings of Islam, but because the impostor god of Islam tells them so.
Notes:

[1] The other day a Muslim man crept up behind a Christian store owner in Egypt and slit his throat for selling alcohol, which is forbidden Muslims.  Because no English language media had mentioned it at the time that I saw it on Arabic media, I translated it here.

ABOUT RAYMOND IBRAHIM

Raymond Ibrahim is a Shillman Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center, a Judith Friedman Rosen Writing Fellow at the Middle East Forum and a CBN News contributor. He is the author of Crucified Again: Exposing Islam’s New War on Christians (2013) and The Al Qaeda Reader (2007).