Friday, July 01, 2016

Dr. Andrew Bostom: The Orlando Jihadist’s 911 Call and Allah Without Camouflage: Timeless Observations From America’s Greatest Scholar of Comparative Religions

To read the entire blogitem by learned scholar, author and thinker, Dr. Andrew Bostom, kindly click on this link: 


http://www.andrewbostom.org/2016/06/the-orlando-jihadists-911-call-and-allah-without-camouflage-timeless-observations-from-americas-greatest-scholar-of-comparative-religions/


The Orlando Jihadist’s 911 Call and Allah Without Camouflage: Timeless Observations From America’s Greatest Scholar of Comparative Religions


From the blogtext:

Islam saw Allah, but not man; saw the claims of deity, not the rights of humanity; saw authority, failed to see freedom—therefore hardened into despotism.
—James Freeman Clarke, 1871
Under withering criticism, last Monday afternoon 6/20/16, a grudging Justice Department released the full, unredacted transcript of Orlando jihadist butcher, and pious Muslim, Omar Mateen’s 911 call during his acts of merciless carnage at a gay nightclub. Upon release of this full transcript, the Justice Department reacted peevishly insisting the morning’s furor over their initial deletions of the words “Islamic State” and the name of ISIS leader “Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi,” was “an unnecessary distraction.” But even the alleged “unredacted” transcript, which included Mateen’s invocation of the bismallah—an Arabic formulation, “in the name of Allah, the merciful, the compassionate [or beneficent],” uttered before commencing a Sharia [Islamic law]sanctioned act—translated “Allah,” the Muslim deity, as “God.”
All Americans, especially those media, political, and academic savants constantly bequeathing us with their putative “wisdom” on Islam, would do well to study James Freeman Clarke’s timeless assessment of Allah, juxtaposed to the Judeo-Christian God. Clarke (1810–1888) was an American theologian, philosopher, author, and abolitionist. He also became one of the first American scholars to study and write about Eastern religions, including, notably, Islam
Arguably still America’s greatest, scholar of comparative religion Clarke expounded upon the Muslim deity in his 1871 treatise, “Ten Great Religions—An Essay in Comparative Theology.” Clarke saw in Islam’s conception of Allah—“that which makes of God pure will . . . divorced from reason and love”—a regression from the Judeo-Christian God.
Comparing Islam to Judaism, Clarke observes,
Goodness does not consist in obedience to divine will, but in conformity to the divine character. This is the doctrine of the Old Testament and one of its noblest characteristics. . . . Mohammedanism is a relapse [from Judaism] . . . for it makes God only an arbitrary sovereign whose will is to be obeyed without any reference to its moral character.