Monday, June 12, 2017

Al Stewart - Constantinople



Al Stewart - Constantinople 

Across the western world
The lights are going down
The gypsy armies of the evening
Have lit their fires across
The nether side of town
They will not pass this way again

So here in the night
Leave your home it's time for running
Out of the light
I see the hosts of Mohammed coming

The Holy Sister bars her doors against the East
Her house has stood too long divided
The uninvited guests are breaking up the feast
She may not bid them leave again

So here in the night
Leave your home it's time for running
Out of the light
I see the hosts of Mohammed coming

I dreamed I stood like this before
And I'm sure the words that I heard then
Were much the same
It's just an old Greek tragedy they're acting here
Held over by popular acclaim

So here in the night
Leave your home it's time for running
Out of the light
I see the hosts of Mohammed coming

Here is a bit about musician Al Stewart from Wikipedia - to read the entire article, kindly click on the link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Stewart


Alastair Ian "Al" Stewart (born 5 September 1945) is a Glasgow-born[1]singer-songwriter and folk-rock musician who rose to prominence as part of the British folk revival in the 1960s and 1970s. He developed a unique style of combining folk-rock songs with delicately woven tales of characters and events from history.[2]
Stewart is best known for his 1976 hit single "Year of the Cat", the title song from the platinum album of the same name. Though Year of the Cat and its 1978 platinum follow-up Time Passages brought Stewart his biggest worldwide commercial successes, earlier albums such as Past, Present and Future from 1973 are often seen as better examples of his intimate brand of historical folk-rock – a style to which he has returned in recent albums.[3]
Stewart was a key figure in British music and he appears throughout the musical folklore of the revivalist era. He played at the first-ever Glastonbury Festival in 1970, knew Yoko Ono before she met John Lennon, shared a London flat with a young Paul Simon, and hosted at the Les Cousins folk club in London in the 1960s.[4]
Stewart has released sixteen studio and three live albums since his debut album Bedsitter Images in 1967, and continues to tour extensively in the US, Canada, Europe, and the UK. His latest release is Uncorked, which was released on his independent label, Wallaby Trails Recordings.[5]
Stewart has worked with Peter WhiteAlan ParsonsJimmy PageRichard ThompsonRick WakemanFrancis MonkmanTori Amos, and Tim Renwick, and more recently has played with Dave Nachmanoff and former Wings lead-guitarist Laurence Juber.

Historian and foremost Islam specialist Raymond Ibrahim has written an essay entitled "The Siege of Byzantium", about one of the most important battles in the history of warfare and one of history`s most decisive moments, the "Second Siege of Byzantium", 717-718. It was originally published in the historically influential American magazine National Review founded by the important American intellectual William F. Buckley Jr.


To read it, kindly click on this link:


http://www.nationalreview.com/article/355824/siege-byzantium-raymond-ibrahim


Here is a bit about the Byzantine Empire from Wikipedia:


The Byzantine Empire, sometimes referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in the East duringLate Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, originally founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[1] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe. Both "Byzantine Empire" and "Eastern Roman Empire" are historiographical terms created after the end of the realm; its citizens continued to refer to their empire as the Roman Empire (Ancient Greek:Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίωνtr. Basileia tôn RhōmaiōnLatinImperium Romanum),[2] or Romania (Ῥωμανία), and to themselves as "Romans".[3]